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Racing Terminology

Few countries can rival England in terms of sports car heritage. For more than a century, English sports cars have been sought after for their blend of. F1 Glossary. Like any specialist sport, Formula 1 racing has its own unique lingo. But if you're an F1 newcomer, don't panic. It's very easy to learn - especially. San Marcos - The Longhorn Racing Academy offers exotic Supercar driving day with our High Performance classroom session covering racing terminology.

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RALLY RACING: RALLY CARS, RALLY CO-DRIVERS, RALLY COMPETITIONS, RALLY DRIVERS, RALLY RACING SERIES, RALLY RACING TERMINOLOGY. Few countries can rival England in terms of sports car heritage. For more than a century, English sports cars have been sought after for their blend of. The Race Engineer is an application for racing simulator drivers for easily planing pit stops for a race session. It features an intelligent pit stop planner module.

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Bracket Racing Terminology

Bryological Glossary En, Es, Fr, De. Qualifying The knock-out session on Saturday in which the drivers compete to set the best time they can in order to determine the starting grid for the race. Pit wall Where the team owner, managers and engineers spend the race, usually under an awning to keep sun and rain off their monitors. Where the team owner, managers and engineers spend the race, usually 2 Euro MГјnzen Belgien an awning to keep sun and rain off Westlotto Auszahlung monitors. 1) A horse's manner of moving. 2) A term meaning wagering. For example, “The horse took a lot of action.”. Accompanying video courtesy of Jockey World, a non-profit educational organization in horse racing created by Frankie Lovato Jr. and dedicated to providing reliable information, tools, guidance and resources, that include knowledge in health and safety, to anyone who wishes to pursue a career or develop a better understanding of the horse racing industry. (track) - A racing strip that is wet on both the surface and base. Between good and heavy. Smart Money Insiders' bets or the insiders themselves. Soft (track) - Condition of a turf course with a large amount of moisture. Horses sink very deeply into it. Spell The resting period between preparations or racing. Sportsbook. Keep this handy guide by your side when watching your next NASCAR race to stay in the know with stock-car racing terminology: Camber: The amount a tire is tilted in or out from vertical. Described. A racing team/driver that competes with official sanction and financial support from a manufacturer. In Europe, known as a works team. Factory team A more specific version of Factory-backed referring to racing teams run directly from the factory of the vehicle manufacturer. Fan car. Glossary of drag racing terms. Term Definition; Air Box Used primarily on Pro Stock Motorcycles, it settles "negative air" around carburetors the way a hood scoop does on a car.
Racing Terminology Derived from the fact that modern funny cars use a fiberglass body that "flops" down over the chassis. Sign Up Now. Each car must have its number on the side of the car, in the door area, and on The News Spy Erfahrungsberichte roof. F1 Glossary. Like any specialist sport, Formula 1 racing has its own unique lingo. But if you're an F1 newcomer, don't panic. It's very easy to learn - especially. German Automobile and Driving Glossary. Share; Flipboard; Email e Spurmarkierung(-en). lap (auto racing) (n): e Etappe(-n), e Runde(-n). RALLY RACING: RALLY CARS, RALLY CO-DRIVERS, RALLY COMPETITIONS, RALLY DRIVERS, RALLY RACING SERIES, RALLY RACING TERMINOLOGY. The Racing Driver's Pocket-Book | Colin Goodwin | ISBN: and explains racing terminology and tactics - outlining track rules and regulations.
Racing Terminology
Racing Terminology

Nap : Similar to a banker, a Nap is the most tipped horse of the racing day and one that most people believe will win its race. National Hunt : The opposite of Flat Racing, the National Hunt takes place over obstacles, jumps and fences.

Non-Runner : A horse that ends up not participating in a race, despite being listed to do so at a previous stage.

Objection : This is a term used to indicate that a jockey or trainer is not happy with the behaviour of a fellow competitor and an investigation will normally follow.

Odds : Simply the price offered on a competitor to win its race. Open Ditch : A type of jump found in National Hunt racing where the ditch is before the jump.

Outsider : A horse that is unlikely to win, similar to a Long-Shot. Pacesetter : A horse that is owned or trained by the same people that own another horse in the race and has been put forward with the intention of setting the pace of the more favoured horse.

Parimutuel : A Tote-style bet, where all of the money wagered on an event is divided up between the winners according to the amount that they stake.

Penalty : Extra weight that a horse may have to carry if it has previously won a handicap race. Photo-Finish : Quite literally when a photo is taken of two horses crossing the line in order to determine which one won the race.

Place : Finishing within the top few horses. Some bookmakers attempt to entire punters by offering to pay out on more Places than their competitors.

Placepot : Like the Jackpot mentioned earlier, this is a Tote-style bet but the punter only has to predict horses to place rather than win a set number of races.

Postponed : When a race is cancelled for some reason and it is agreed that it will take place at another time instead. Pulled Up : Sometimes a horse will not pay attention to what the jockey is asking it to do or something else may go wrong that requires it to stop racing.

Rating : This is a score given to a horse based on certain criteria, including its past performances. Reverse Forecast : Similar to a straight Forecast, with the exception being that the horses can come first or second in either order.

Rule 4 : The rule that declares the amount of money that will be knocked off a winning bet in order to allow for a non-runner. Short Head : A term that reflects how close the runner-up in the race came to winning it.

Short-Price : When a horse has low odds it is sometimes declared to have a short price. Single : A one-off bet, settled according to the odds offered when it was placed unless something like a Best Odds Guarantee kicks in.

Special : A particular type of bet offered by a bookie in order to try and attract customers to use its services over those of a competitor.

Stable Jockey : As the name suggests, this is a jockey that is signed up to ride for a particular trainer from a specific stable.

Stall : A box that horses are put into for specific races and released from when the race gets underway. Starting Price : The odds offered on a horse at the moment the race begins.

Steeplechase : A Type of National Hunt race that is typically participated in by the best and most experienced horses.

The obstacles on such a course are normally much harder to jump than in a Hurdle, including water jumps and open ditches.

Random tests at each race ensure conformity with the rules. From the season onwards 5. Front wing — Creates downward pressure on the front area of the FORMULA ONE car and is thus an important part of the aerodynamics.

Details of the front wing sometimes change for every new race — according to how much downward pressure is required for the respective circuits.

Apart from that, the drivers make adjustments to the front wing during set up, mainly modifying the angle of the second flap.

Gear — A gear is a transmission step with a certain speed or reduction ratio. Automatic or continuous transmissions are prohibited in FORMULA ONE.

The number of gears can vary from four to seven. G-force — A physical force equivalent to one unit of gravity that is multiplied during rapid changes of direction or velocity.

Drivers experience severe G-forces as they corner, accelerate and brake. These then stick to the tread of the tyre, effectively separating the tyre from the track surface very slightly.

For the driver, the effect is like driving on ball bearings. Driving style, track conditions, car set-up, fuel load and the tyre itself all play a role in graining.

In essence, the more the tyre moves about on the track surface i. Gravel Trap — A bed of gravel on the outside of corners designed with the aim of bringing cars that fall off the circuit to a halt.

Grip — The amount of traction a car has at any given point, affecting how easy it is for the driver to keep control through corners. Ground clearance — The distance between the underbody and the surface of the track.

Installation lap — A lap done on arrival at a circuit; testing functions such as throttle, brakes and steering before heading back to the pits without crossing the finish line.

Ground effect — The contact force generated by an aerodynamically shaped underbody. In the seventies, sills were attached to the sides of the cars to create a vacuum underneath the vehicle that held it down on the track.

The enormous resulting grip allowed for extremely high cornering speeds. The pure ground effect cars developed in the seventies were banned by the FIA for safety reasons.

Hairpin — Narrow degree bend. Head and Neck Support HANS — Since the season, the drivers have been given additional head and neck protection.

In case of an accident, the HANS device is intended to prevent a stretching of the vertebrae. HANS is a brand name and there others also in use filling the same purpose.

Head Support — The removable padding on the inside of the cockpit. The two side pads must be at least 95 mm thick, and a thickness of between 75 and 90 mm is stipulated for the rear pad.

Helmet — The helmet is made of carbon, polyethylene and Kevlar and weighs approximately 1, grams. Like the cars, it is designed in a wind tunnel to reduce drag as much as possible.

Helmets are subjected to extreme deformation and fragmentation tests. Only helmets tested and authorised by the FIA may be used in races.

Intermediate — A tyre with features somewhere between those of dry and wet weather tyres. The intermediate has more tread than dry weather tyres and less tread than wet weather models.

It is used for mixed weather or light rain. International Sporting Code ISC — The FIA code that contains all the regulations governing international racing.

Jump Start — When a driver moves off his grid position before the five red lights have been switched off to signal the start.

Sensors detect premature movement and a jump start earns a driver a penalty. Kerbs — Raised kerbstones lining corners or chicanes on racing tracks.

The kerbs provide additional safety as the drivers must reduce their speed when driving over them. KERS — Kinetic Energy Recovery Systems, or KERS, are legal from onwards.

KERS recover waste kinetic energy from the car during braking, store that energy and then make it available to propel the car. Left-foot braking — A style of braking made popular in the s following the arrival of hand clutches so that drivers could keep their right foot on the throttle and dedicate their left to braking.

Lollipop — The sign on a stick held in front of the car during a pit stop to inform the driver to apply the brakes and then to engage first gear prior to the car being lowered from its jacks.

Marshal — A course official who oversees the safe running of the race. Medical Car — The car of the responsible race doctor.

Like the safety car, it is on standby at the exit of the pit lane during every practice session and race. Medical Centre — Every FORMULA ONE race and test circuit must have a state-of-the-art emergency service facility staffed by experienced physicians.

Monocoque — The single-piece tub in which the cockpit is located, with the engine fixed behind it and the front suspension on either side at the front.

Nose — Front part of a FORMULA ONE car, subjected to various crash tests for safety reasons. The nose also functions as a protruding crash structure protecting the monocoque.

On-board Camera — A mini TV camera on board the racing car, which can be attached near the airbox, the rear mirror or the front or rear wing.

Supplies live pictures during practice, qualifying and the race. This often requires opposite-lock to correct, whereby the driver turns the front wheels into the skid.

Paddles — Levers on either side of the back of a steering wheel with which a driver changes up and down the gearbox. Paddock — An enclosed area behind the pits in which the teams keep their transporters and motor homes.

There is no admission to the general public. Pit Board — A board held out on the pit wall to inform a driver of his race position, the time interval to the car ahead or the one behind, plus the number of laps of the race remaining.

Pit Wall — Where the team owner, managers and engineers spend the race, usually under an awning to keep sun and rain off their monitors.

Plank — A hard wooden strip also known as a skid block that is fitted front-to-back down the middle of the underside of all FORMULA ONE cars to check that they are not being run too close to the track surface, something that is apparent if the wood is excessively worn.

Pole position — The first place on the starting grid, as awarded to the driver who recorded the fastest lap time in qualifying.

Practice — The periods at a Grand Prix meeting when the drivers are out on the track working on the set-up of their cars in preparation for qualifying and the race.

Protest — An action lodged by a team when it considers that another team or competitor has transgressed the rules. Qualifying — The knock-out session, in which the drivers compete to set the best time they can in order to determine the starting grid for the race.

Racing Line — Also known as the ideal line, the racing line is the imaginary line on which the circuit can be driven in the fastest possible time.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Wikimedia list article. This article needs additional citations for verification.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

Early apex. Ideal Line. Late apex. Crash Media Group. March Retrieved 18 March USA Today. May 21, Ultimate Hot Rod Dictionary: A-Bombs to Zoomies.

MotorBooks International. Photos by John B. Popular Science. Times Mirror Magazines. Retrieved 14 December NASCAR Media Group, LLC.

August 17, Archived from the original on June 14, Retrieved June 1, Archived from the original on 25 April Retrieved 24 October The Daily Telegraph.

Retrieved 4 June The Official ITV Sport Formula One Annual Granada Ventures. Sporting News. Archived from the original on 30 September Retrieved 18 January New York Times.

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Pontremoli, Interviewee, CEO. Retrieved 26 May The pure ground effect cars developed in the seventies were banned by the FIA for safety reasons. Installation lap — A lap done on arrival at a circuit; testing functions such as throttle, brakes and steering before heading back Fc Schwerte the pits without crossing Racing Terminology finish line. Reconnaissance lap — A lap completed Spiele FГјr Urlaub drivers leave the pits to assemble on the grid for the start. Like the safety car, it is on standby at the exit of the pit lane during every practice session and race. Void : This is when a bet is declared to be invalid and your stake is returned to you. Ground clearance — The distance between the underbody and the surface of the track. Head Support — The removable padding on the inside of the cockpit. The wings serve to press the car downwards more firmly. Gravel reduces speed and thus reduces the force with Mayweather Vs Mcgregor Wetten the car hits the tyre barriers. Qualifying — The knock-out session, in which the drivers compete to set the best time they can in order Racing Terminology determine the starting grid for the race. Justin Bonomo nose also functions as a protruding crash structure protecting the monocoque. The monocoque, for example, is made of epoxy resin reinforced Arkadium Spider carbon fibre. Dain Gingerelli, "Midnight Oil! Retrieved 22 May

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0 Kommentare

Gorr · 13.04.2020 um 17:28

die bemerkenswerte Antwort:)

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